Overscheduling and overachieving

Overscheduling and overachieving

Recently someone shared the post “The Disease of Being Busy” by Omid Safi on Facebook. I’m grateful for that. Because I read the article at work and I was so busy I just rushed through the article, but then it hit me : I had to sit down and read through it properly. Safi’s view to our overscheduled life is sad, but brings it exactly to the point. We all must slow down, and have to be willing to let things go or postpone things which can wait. But there’s the infitinite fear of missing something.
I thought that after studying and working part-time, a time with less schedules and planned time slots would come. I was never that wrong. I am just…so f***ing busy. Travel to work, work, travel home, three times sports a week, sometimes tournament or match, going to the movies, going out, having a drink, going to an apero, go to the grocery store… The list is endless… And all is scheduled in my calendar. I am a person who gives (or tries to give) all I can in everything I do. And I’m glad there are people in my environment who tell me to stop! To take a breath! We all must slow down. We can make time for family and life or other important causes – we just have to be willing to let some things go and realize other things can wait.  And often this is difficult, because you think you’ll miss something! (hi Facebook)
I really recommend to read Safi’s post. Here some points I copied out of it:
  • How did we create a world in which we have more and more and more to do with less time for leisure, less time for reflection, less time for community, less time to just… be?
  • Since the 1950s, we have had so many new technological innovations that we thought (or were promised) would make our lives easier, faster, simpler. Yet, we have no more “free” or leisurely time today than we did decades ago.
  • For some of us, the “privileged” ones, the lines between work and home have become blurred. We are on our devices. All. The. Freaking. Time.
  • I want to know how your heart is doing, at this very moment. Tell me. Tell me your heart is joyous, tell me your heart is aching, tell me your heart is sad, tell me your heart craves a human touch.
  • […] checking off items from your to-do list.
  • So what’s the price we pay for being busy? It’s not that being busy makes us more stressed, or less efficient, or less pleasant. It’s that we miss out. We miss out on an extraordinary amount of time, of being present, of living in intimacy with the people we love the most. The price we pay is… intimacy.
And the most essential question:

When did we forget that we are human beings, not human doings?